Category: green design

29
Aug
2016

affordable green buildings: lessons from the Make It Right Homes

To understand how to build affordable green buildings, it’s useful to look toward low-income communities where these strategies are being applied at scale, where costs and paybacks are being measured. The Make It Right (MIR) Foundation is just such a test-bed community – a Petri dish for our examination. Make It Right builds affordable green homes and buildings and began by with the reconstruction of the Lower 9th Ward in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina. Started by Brad Pitt in 2007, Make it Right buildings are LEED Platinum certified and inspired by Cradle to Cradle thinking. The MIR Foundation’s primary goal is to change the building industry by implementing green building strategies that is affordable to all.   MIR utilizes an array of methods:

  •  Advanced framing to reduce material and labor costs: studs at 24″ on center or the use of structural insulated panels are some of the techniques used (R-25 walls, R-33 roof, R-13 subfloor).  Less labor means more affordable.  Less materials means more green.
  • Interior finishes that are low or no off-gassing make for healthy living.
  • Green electrical through wireless electrical system (Verve).  The higher cost of the system is offset by lower cost for installation.
  • A high velocity air-conditioning system reduces size of duct/trunk lines which can then run in the structure, saving on structural and finishing costs.
  • Well insulated walls and air tight buildings reduce energy loads and therfore long-term operational costs.  Green Insulation such as spray foam and recycled denim insulation are used.
  • Low-flow faucets, shower heads and dual flush toilets reduce water consumption.
  • Cisterns for irrigation also reduce water usage.
  • Tankless water heaters means no tanks — water is heated only when needed which reduces energy costs.
  • 4.25 KW solar array (grid-tied/net-metered) uses the sun to generate energy for the buildings.
  • Building Information Management (BIM) allows the organization to analyze and reconfigure the building DNA as it evolves.  BIM provides feedback to increase the efficiencies to make their buildings ever more affordable and green.

The typical HERS (Home Energy Rating System) of a home is 100. The typical Make it Right home has a HERS rating of 15-20, or an 80% reduction in energy use over the typical. For $150/SF, including solar panels (of which a portion receives a government tax goodies), this is a remarkable feat.

02
Aug
2016

Modern Green Virginia Beach House Tour

Tour of soon-to-be-finished modern green Virginia beach house on August 11th at 6:00 PM.  Meet at the Cavalier Golf and Yacht Club (parking lot nearest the clubhouse) at 1052 Cardinal Road, Virginia Beach, VA.  Attendance limited.  Please RSVP to aewing@hays-ewing.com.

House features:

Superinsulated and designed to meet Passivhaus standards, triple glazed windows, Huber Zip system, FSC certified woods and many other sustainable features.  A second floor outdoor covered living space offers a stunning view of Linkhorn Bay.  See also Facebook event.

Virginia beach architects

Custom home located in Virginia Beach.

28
Jul
2016

Solar Energy: Let the sun shape the roof

Solar energy is becoming more affordable by the day (see blog post 3/16/2106).  Before long, the cost for solar power will become cheaper than grid-sourced.  Twenty years ago the payback on solar was roughly equal to the lifespan of the solar array.  Still, we designed our roofs to accept solar panels, looking forward to the day that the economic case could be made to mount those panels on a project’s roof.  Recently-built Solar Faber project has not had to wait for those panels – with a return on investment of over 5%, the economic case can now be made.  The big, south facing roof of the project was designed with that intent.  What’s more, if the sun shapes the roof, the roof shapes the interior of the house, adding height and interest.  It’s a two-for-one proposition that makes so much sense for both the environment and the quality of life for the building owner.

Solar energy: roof design

If the sun shapes the roof, the roof shapes the interior.

12
Apr
2016

Virginia Beach House Tour

Announcing a house tour at the soon-to-be completed house on Linkhorn Bay in Virginia Beach.  The tour will be postponed date to be determined.  We will meet in the parking lot of the Cavalier Golf and Yacht Club at 1052 Cardinal Road, Virginia Beach.  Limited attendance.  Please RSVP to aewing@hays-ewing.com See more details below.

tour_brochure.pptx

01
Feb
2016

Creating layers of value – What’s good for environment is good for business.

We consider a project unsatisfactory if it’s just beautiful.  We consider a project unsatisfactory if it’s only green — or only functional.  We consider a project falls short if it’s not a good fit for it’s natural setting or urban context.  We seek to create layers of value.  Case in point:  We were asked by Norfolk region based Haynes Furniture to do a facelift on their exterior facade.  Our solution – create a facade that is beautiful but also shades the entrance glazing from unwanted heat gain.  Beautiful and functional.  We wanted to transform the parking lot to one that was full of trees and native plants that filter stormwater before it reaches the endangered Chesapeake Bay.  Beautiful, native to place and green.

We believe by adding layers of value our clients get more for their investment.  Good for the environment, good for business.green architect Norfolk

 

26
Oct
2015

Lewis & Clark Exploratory Center of Virginia: Engaging people is key to a building’s success

We design with the philosophy that engaging people in our buildings is key to a project’s success.  We think a lot about how to create opportunities for discovery, for collaboration, for a conversation with nature… Take for example, The Lewis & Clark Exploratory Center (LCEC).  We designed the roof as an vegetated garden/overlook to the Rivanna River.  This is where a visitor first arrives and the roof signals the building’s larger goals: to connect to the Lewis & Clark story, and to engage the visitor with nature.  The vegetated roof is to be planted with species gathered by the explorers on their journey west.  The overlook, with a replica of a ship in the foreground and the Rivanna in the background, recalls to the visitor that the exploration was carried out by river.  The building also teaches about water, how precious it is, how it is the source of life: the roof water is directed to a riverstone channel that flanks the stairs descending to the exhibit space.  Water is collected in a basin at the entry below and the visitor crosses a bridge to enter the building – again, references to Lewis & Clark’s river journey as well as modern concerns about the environment and the importance of water quality.  The building is designed to achieve LEED Silver, and its many sustainable features are teaching examples for visitors.  Best of all though is how active the center is with community activities.  The building teaches about the Lewis & Clark’s journey, about nature while serving as an ideal setting for the activities organized by LCEC.  It is gratifying to see our goals realized.  IMG_1463IMG_1478

31
Aug
2015

Harness the Sun at the Community Level

huangbaiyuhouse_blog

Design for passive solar home in China proposes wind turbine and vegetable gardens on roofs.

Passive solar design is well understood yet little considered at the community design level. New York City planners had the foresight to lay out the NYC street grid with solar aspect in mind. For community planners, considering solar path is so simple yet largely ignored.  Imagine laying out streets and houses around the sun so that rooms enjoy daylight without solar heat gain, where front and rear yards are oriented on the north-south axis and sideyards to east and west. Thus floor plans can more easily be adapted to locate the service spaces to the north (kitchen, closets, baths) and living spaces (living, dining, bedrooms) to the south.  This simple idea can have a profound effect on the long-term energy use of the individual homes and of the neighborhood collectively and with little or no cost, has big marketing potential. Community developers and planners should wake up to the logic of this win-win solution.

village_blog

The design of this new community in China (team led by Allison Ewing while Partner at William McDonough + Partners) was designed to take advantage of solar path at all scales of design, from the community to the room.

 

28
Aug
2015

Charlottesville VA architect Chris Hays interview with Home Style Green

Charlottesville VA architect Chris Hays Interview with Home Style Green

Charlottesville VA architect Chris Hays talks with broadcaster Matthew Cutler-Welsh about how homes can improve your life.  The covered outdoor space of the Dogtrot House has transformed the lives of its inhabitants who spend their waking hours in the courtyard space during the summer and shoulder seasons.  It’s gratifying to see how a well-designed home can make life better.  Listen in ITunes

Green Style Home

13
Aug
2015

Allison Ewing shares her green design expertise at Hanley Wood’s Vision 2020 Symposium

Allison Ewing shares her expertise on green design at the Hanley Wood Vision 2020 Video Symposium. She discusses why the building is at a Darwinian crossroads and it’s time to evolve an Architecture of the Fittest. Architects must find solutions that are attractive to home developers who will build 75% of new housing in the coming decades. Nature, with 3.8 billion years of R&D has a lot to teach us about adaptive — and cost effective — strategies in a changing environment. Ms. Ewing discusses how bigger is not better, rather connecting people with the landscape is fulfilling, and how creative designers are finding clever solutions to living richly in a small setting. She tackles creating the zero energy home, the use of low-embodied energy materials and new technologies such as 3D printed buildings which will transform how we build. Some researchers are even exploring buildings which are self-assembling, patterning processes on nature.
https://twitter.com/Ewing_Allison, https://www.facebook.com/HaysEwingDesignStudio, https://www.linkedin.com/pub/allison-ewing/b/929/710

05
Mar
2014

engaging the developer

The developer-builder operates under a series of environmental pressures the most important of which is to sell homes while making a profit.  The Developer-Builders consider first costs, first because profit equals marketability less first costs.  Lifecycle benefits have no power over a builder unless those costs can be justified in sales.  Not surprisingly, strategies such as solar aquatics systems, solar panels, geothermal, etc., have no attraction to the Developer-Builder because the long-term costs savings are realized by the Owner.  So where is the magic line between additional up-front costs and increased marketability?  Robert Hauser of Stonehaus Development in Charlottesville, Virginia thinks an increase in costs of 3-5% is an acceptable risk if his company can successfully brand its houses as energy-efficient.

That leads us to consider adaptive options that are within the Developer-Builder risk-tolerant zone.  So the question is, how can we achieve carbon neutrality by 2030 in a cost-effective way?  We must do so optimizing passive strategies: community, massing, envelope design, and passive solar – all strategies with lower first costs. This is what it will take to transform a profit-driven industry.