Blog

13
Oct
2016

In pursuit of happiness – the question of size and architecture

In November of 2014 I wrote about the Not so Big Apartment and of Gary Chang’s clever Swiss army knife style apartment that transforms into 24 different spaces.   I admired the inventiveness of Cheng’s project and the notion of living well in a small setting.

The topic of size comes up a lot at architectural conferences. The issue is an important one for obvious reasons – bigger homes require more energy to heat and cool and more energy goes into the construction materials. Clients however aren’t always so interested in the notion of doing with less. That’s not surprising in the US, home to the super-sized Big Mac and it’s cousin the McMansion.

At HEDS we think big, from the perspective of living well, is beside the point –size has very little to do with the qualities that foster a sense of well-being and happiness. Size is what builders promote in the absence of good design. This is size over substance thinking – size is a false prize.

We share our clients’ goal that our designs should contribute to their happiness and well-being. In pursuit of their happiness, we promote more substantive qualities such as homes that bring richness through CLEVER ideas. Other qualities we pursue in our designs: FUN, COMMUNITY at all levels (between siblings, within the family, with neighbors and the larger community), a connection with NATURE, and last but not least, COOL.

In pursuit of COOL: The Exbury Egg by Pad Studio, Spud Group and Stephen Turner.

In pursuit of COOL: The Exbury Egg by Pad Studio, Spud Group and Stephen Turner.

Children's room

In pursuit of FUN and COMMUNITY. This kids room has a shared loft. An art wall exhibits the children’s masks. A window between the children’s rooms fosters community between siblings. When small these children held hands between the window and have grown up to be close friends. Woolen Mills House by HEDS.

Dogtrot House

In Pursuit of Nature: A captured outdoor space brings nature into the daily living for this home’s occupants. The space is used for sitting and dining during the spring, summer and fall. Dogtrot House by HEDS. Photo by Prakash Patel.

29
Aug
2016

affordable green buildings: lessons from the Make It Right Homes

To understand how to build affordable green buildings, it’s useful to look toward low-income communities where these strategies are being applied at scale, where costs and paybacks are being measured. The Make It Right (MIR) Foundation is just such a test-bed community – a Petri dish for our examination. Make It Right builds affordable green homes and buildings and began by with the reconstruction of the Lower 9th Ward in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina. Started by Brad Pitt in 2007, Make it Right buildings are LEED Platinum certified and inspired by Cradle to Cradle thinking. The MIR Foundation’s primary goal is to change the building industry by implementing green building strategies that is affordable to all.   MIR utilizes an array of methods:

  •  Advanced framing to reduce material and labor costs: studs at 24″ on center or the use of structural insulated panels are some of the techniques used (R-25 walls, R-33 roof, R-13 subfloor).  Less labor means more affordable.  Less materials means more green.
  • Interior finishes that are low or no off-gassing make for healthy living.
  • Green electrical through wireless electrical system (Verve).  The higher cost of the system is offset by lower cost for installation.
  • A high velocity air-conditioning system reduces size of duct/trunk lines which can then run in the structure, saving on structural and finishing costs.
  • Well insulated walls and air tight buildings reduce energy loads and therfore long-term operational costs.  Green Insulation such as spray foam and recycled denim insulation are used.
  • Low-flow faucets, shower heads and dual flush toilets reduce water consumption.
  • Cisterns for irrigation also reduce water usage.
  • Tankless water heaters means no tanks — water is heated only when needed which reduces energy costs.
  • 4.25 KW solar array (grid-tied/net-metered) uses the sun to generate energy for the buildings.
  • Building Information Management (BIM) allows the organization to analyze and reconfigure the building DNA as it evolves.  BIM provides feedback to increase the efficiencies to make their buildings ever more affordable and green.

The typical HERS (Home Energy Rating System) of a home is 100. The typical Make it Right home has a HERS rating of 15-20, or an 80% reduction in energy use over the typical. For $150/SF, including solar panels (of which a portion receives a government tax goodies), this is a remarkable feat.

02
Aug
2016

Modern Green Virginia Beach House Tour

Tour of soon-to-be-finished modern green Virginia beach house on August 11th at 6:00 PM.  Meet at the Cavalier Golf and Yacht Club (parking lot nearest the clubhouse) at 1052 Cardinal Road, Virginia Beach, VA.  Attendance limited.  Please RSVP to aewing@hays-ewing.com.

House features:

Superinsulated and designed to meet Passivhaus standards, triple glazed windows, Huber Zip system, FSC certified woods and many other sustainable features.  A second floor outdoor covered living space offers a stunning view of Linkhorn Bay.  See also Facebook event.

Virginia beach architects

Custom home located in Virginia Beach.

28
Jul
2016

Solar Energy: Let the sun shape the roof

Solar energy is becoming more affordable by the day (see blog post 3/16/2106).  Before long, the cost for solar power will become cheaper than grid-sourced.  Twenty years ago the payback on solar was roughly equal to the lifespan of the solar array.  Still, we designed our roofs to accept solar panels, looking forward to the day that the economic case could be made to mount those panels on a project’s roof.  Recently-built Solar Faber project has not had to wait for those panels – with a return on investment of over 5%, the economic case can now be made.  The big, south facing roof of the project was designed with that intent.  What’s more, if the sun shapes the roof, the roof shapes the interior of the house, adding height and interest.  It’s a two-for-one proposition that makes so much sense for both the environment and the quality of life for the building owner.

Solar energy: roof design

If the sun shapes the roof, the roof shapes the interior.

11
May
2016

Virginia’s Lewis & Clark Exploratory Center in film

Teen filmmaker James Hill documentary showcases the Lewis & Clark Exploratory Center’s green features.  It’s great to see the next generation taking on these serious questions.

12
Apr
2016

Virginia Beach House Tour

Announcing a house tour at the soon-to-be completed house on Linkhorn Bay in Virginia Beach.  The tour will be postponed date to be determined.  We will meet in the parking lot of the Cavalier Golf and Yacht Club at 1052 Cardinal Road, Virginia Beach.  Limited attendance.  Please RSVP to aewing@hays-ewing.com See more details below.

tour_brochure.pptx

09
Mar
2016

Solar Power becoming dirt cheap

A new product will make solar energy dirt cheap.  Solar power used to have a payback of about 20 years. The lifespan of photovoltaic (PV) panels was about 20 years, making solar a difficult sell given the high cost. We knew one day the price of PVs would become cheaper than fossil fuels and that day is not far off. While oil prices are coming down, so are PVs –the price of solar and other green technologies are offering affordable options to renewable power.  In fact, some projections see the cost of solar becoming cheaper than fossil fuels within five years.  Researchers developing the new solar cell made with perovskites (current technology uses silicon), project the technology will cost just 10 to 20 cents per watt. Currently, solar costs around 75 cents a watt.  The  U.S. Department of Energy projects 50 cents per watt will allow solar power to compete with oil.

A new start-up Oxford Photovoltaics is commercializing the product.  Meanwhile, solar cells made with silicon are also coming down in price.  All this is great news for achieving net zero at an affordable cost. Solar power, green architects virginia

01
Feb
2016

Creating layers of value – What’s good for environment is good for business.

We consider a project unsatisfactory if it’s just beautiful.  We consider a project unsatisfactory if it’s only green — or only functional.  We consider a project falls short if it’s not a good fit for it’s natural setting or urban context.  We seek to create layers of value.  Case in point:  We were asked by Norfolk region based Haynes Furniture to do a facelift on their exterior facade.  Our solution – create a facade that is beautiful but also shades the entrance glazing from unwanted heat gain.  Beautiful and functional.  We wanted to transform the parking lot to one that was full of trees and native plants that filter stormwater before it reaches the endangered Chesapeake Bay.  Beautiful, native to place and green.

We believe by adding layers of value our clients get more for their investment.  Good for the environment, good for business.green architect Norfolk

 

28
Dec
2015

Low-energy solutions

We humans, occupants of the habitat we call The World, find ourselves in a predicament – confronted by a changing environment, we must adapt and do so quickly, achieving carbon neutrality by 2030 (See Ed Mazria’s 2030 Challenge). Advocates of biomimicry point to nature, with 3.8 billion years of R&D, as a source for cost-effective, low-energy strategies.  I recently read about the “Ripe Chair,” a project by Andreas Konradsen, part of the DON’T RUN OUT exhibit held in Paris this week, where a steel frame chair was submerged in salt water to naturally weld the joints.  ripe_chair

This process recalls one the Romans used in the production of concrete – they compacted volcanic ash and lime in forms submerged in sea water.  The mix, when in contact with sea water, underwent a chemical reaction to form concrete more durable than today’s.

Those of us architects focussed on sustainability think a lot about creating zero-energy use buildings.  The energy that goes into the production of materials used in buildings is equally important with the embodied energy associated with materials attributed to many years of a building’s life cycle costs.

Among the many materials buildings employ, concrete is the biggest contributor to greenhouse gases (an estimated at 7%).  The Roman’s knew how to produce low-energy concrete, how is it we continue to produce high-energy Portland Cement when there are solutions?  Research into alternatives, such as Belite Cement, is underway and Drexel University has produced a low-energy concrete.  There are other researchers exploring low-energy solutions.  Once these alternatives are on the market, I’m hoping the building industry can move quickly embrace the DON’T RUN OUT philosophy to integrate these technologies into new construction.

 

 

26
Oct
2015

Lewis & Clark Exploratory Center of Virginia: Engaging people is key to a building’s success

We design with the philosophy that engaging people in our buildings is key to a project’s success.  We think a lot about how to create opportunities for discovery, for collaboration, for a conversation with nature… Take for example, The Lewis & Clark Exploratory Center (LCEC).  We designed the roof as an vegetated garden/overlook to the Rivanna River.  This is where a visitor first arrives and the roof signals the building’s larger goals: to connect to the Lewis & Clark story, and to engage the visitor with nature.  The vegetated roof is to be planted with species gathered by the explorers on their journey west.  The overlook, with a replica of a ship in the foreground and the Rivanna in the background, recalls to the visitor that the exploration was carried out by river.  The building also teaches about water, how precious it is, how it is the source of life: the roof water is directed to a riverstone channel that flanks the stairs descending to the exhibit space.  Water is collected in a basin at the entry below and the visitor crosses a bridge to enter the building – again, references to Lewis & Clark’s river journey as well as modern concerns about the environment and the importance of water quality.  The building is designed to achieve LEED Silver, and its many sustainable features are teaching examples for visitors.  Best of all though is how active the center is with community activities.  The building teaches about the Lewis & Clark’s journey, about nature while serving as an ideal setting for the activities organized by LCEC.  It is gratifying to see our goals realized.  IMG_1463IMG_1478